Volvo Ocean Race

Despre cursele de barci, regate, raliuri, transaturi, et caetera
Scrie răspuns
Avatar utilizator
skipper
Flottillenadmiral
Flottillenadmiral
Mesaje: 2563
Membru din: Mar Apr 19, 2011 7:35 pm
Localitate: Bucuresti
Contact:

Re: Volvo Ocean Race

Mesaj necitit de skipper »

Si o parere avizata exprimata la rece dupa ce s-a terminat cursa.

Volvo Ocean Race: The Aftermath

Sailing’s premier offshore race has some soul-searching to do as it takes steps to ensure its future.
by Ken Read

Imagine
PUMA Ocean Racing skipper Ken Read contemplates his next move on the racecourse, and the future of the Volvo Ocean Race.


Life during 39,000 miles of ocean sailing isn’t easy. Yes, I wish we had won the Volvo Ocean Race, so everyone can stop tiptoeing around me when talking about our result. We had our bad breaks, and yes, I’ve done the math and know the outcome would’ve been different if our mast had stayed up on Leg 1. But that’s sport, and that’s why we do it. That’s why we play the game. There are never guarantees, and I’m extremely proud of the team, the adventure, and the true grit we showed to get ourselves back into the fight and eventually onto the podium.

These big Volvo Ocean Race programs, including our own PUMA Ocean Racing, powered by BERG, are made of a million parts: sailors, family, shore team, build team, design team, engineers, operations, logistics, sponsors, guests. The list goes on and on. Managing the whole thing is not simple, and in many cases, we certainly learned as we went. The actual sailing, in a way, is the easy part no matter how hard it is.

The Volvo Ocean Race is a spectacular event—the best in sailing—and having been inside it for the past decade, I’ve seen firsthand how much of a viable commercial opportunity the race is for sponsors to peddle their wares and network their businesses around the globe. It’s a true adventure event where sailors push body and mind harder than imaginable. It showcases the cutting edge of offshore sailing to diehard sailors, and hooks complete strangers who—once they’re into it—become true fans.

If you could only look through our eyes at certain times, I guarantee you’d be amazed at what we saw. The media crewmembers try to get you to see it through their lenses, but there’s absolutely nothing like being there, to experience the true height of the waves, the whale breaching next to the boat, and the waterspouts twisting around. When do we allow fear to creep into our brains? Never. I don’t remember being scared, but I do remember quite a few times thinking about the insanity of the moment. The Southern Ocean gained a little more respect in all of our eyes—as if it needed more. The China Sea is and always will be a lousy stretch of water to race across.

Now that our adventure has gone full circle, people often ask me about the future of the race and the decision by its owners to go one-design for the next edition. As I’ve written before, at the outset I really didn’t embrace the one-design idea because development is what the Volvo Ocean Race has always been about. As it is with the America’s Cup, this race takes smart, creative people and forces them to think way outside the box—within the box. It’s no easy feat to create a boat that is blazing fast and capable of withstanding the brutality of an unpredictable ocean. The two demands are always at odds, but ultimately the fastest and most prepared boat usually wins. When there’s variety in the fleet, there are more surprises, and for the hard-core racing fans, the boats themselves can take on a personality of their own.

There’s no denying that an event such as the Volvo Ocean Race continues to face incredible pressure. The goal has to be to keep everyone’s attention from start to finish, which is especially difficult over nine months and so many miles. For better or worse, the race needs drama.

In the last edition, there was a lot of debate about whether the race lost or gained fan base when five of the six boats suffered breakages on a major leg, leaving only one boat to finish without actually stopping to repair along the way. I could make a case either way. On the one hand, when there’s a major emergency, a rabid fan will pay attention because they are genuinely concerned about the team. On the other hand, a new fan may follow along, intrigued by the suspense of boats breaking and limping to shore while others speed off to glory. Lord knows we got a lot of attention when our mast came down and we detoured to Tristan de Cunha.

But the event organizers don’t see it that way. They’re all about the numbers, the competitive participation, and the commercial support that comes along with it. When they have more boats on the racetrack, there’s a guaranteed “race” without fear of losing too many boats on a given leg.

So, here we go, to a one-design 65-footer. There’s no stopping this train. The Volvo Management Group, led by CEO Knut Frostad, believes in the one-design as its salvation because it will reduce the cost of entry and attract more entries. I hope they’re right, but as much as I want to see this race succeed, I strongly believe that event management must do more than simply lower the cost of a campaign. They have to start listening better to the concerns of competitors and sponsors—past and present. This has been a challenge because the event organization is too big and top-heavy. For example, during this past event, there were over twice the number of employees inside the management group than there were sailors in the event. And my experience in big companies is that good communication is often the first thing to break down.

They also can’t sit back on their laurels and hope that more teams will enter by simply making the race less expensive. There is a lot of competition for the best sailors, and sponsorship dollars are scarce. Event management makes it seem as though it is a “privilege” for teams to participate. It has to be the other way around. When a team, or potential team, signs on or simply shows interest, management must go out of their way to listen to their needs, keep them happy, keep them informed, and engage them for the long term.

As I write, I’m thinking about whether I’ve got another Volvo in my future—I certainly learned to “never say never.” I do desperately want the Volvo Ocean Race to survive and thrive like I know it can. I told our team nearly every day that our primary job was to sell sneakers and propellers for our sponsors, and of course, the best way to do that is to win. But at the end of the day, I admit that the sport and the event must win through attracting the best sailors and sponsors, and learning how to say “yes” more often.
Ubi allii finiverant, inde incipimus nos!

Avatar utilizator
skipper
Flottillenadmiral
Flottillenadmiral
Mesaje: 2563
Membru din: Mar Apr 19, 2011 7:35 pm
Localitate: Bucuresti
Contact:

Re: Volvo Ocean Race

Mesaj necitit de skipper »

Urmatoare editie: o parere din punct de vedere meteo!

This is your chance to (virtually) sail the Volvo Ocean Race 2014-15 before anyone else! Race meteorologist and all-round route expert Gonzalo Infante is taking us step by step through the 39,895 nautical miles of the new course in an interview that will run over the next three days. Enjoy!

Alicante – Recife: 3,421 nm

Gonzalo Infante:
It will be a familiar start for the Volvo Ocean Race fleet as they head out of the Mediterranean, into the Atlantic. The difference this time is that the teams will make their first stop nearby at Recife in the north east of Brazil.

It all begins with some unpredictable coastal sailing in the Mediterranean Sea. The autumn weather in the Levante area, from Valencia to Murcia, is an extreme season. Why? Because the air is cold and the Mediterranean Sea is still warm, which enhances the chances of low formations. These are very favourable conditions for storm development. They create a lot of short and choppy waves too, which are very hard on the boats and the sailors.

The Alboran Sea, from Palos to Gibraltar, is the perfect wind channel with high mountains on the Spanish and the Moroccan sides. On top of this is a permanent oceanographic feature with a lot of current due to the exchanges between the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. From Alicante to Palos, the big gains or losses are about playing the coastal effects. A lot of strategy will be involved and will depend on the direction of the wind too – in autumn, it usually blows from the east but in case of westerly winds it will be an upwind Mediterranean exit.

Crossing Gibraltar is always very tricky. The weather at this transition point is either very rough or very light. If rough, it’s difficult because of the traffic and the sea state. If light, you can go backwards!

Before crossing, you also have to decide on your strategy after Gibraltar – going west at the beginning or going south-southwest to follow the traditional trade winds. That decision depends of how well established the trade winds are. Last time there were just a bit late and west was best: Groupama missed them when following the African coast.

Then comes the doldrums crossing. This time, as the race starts sooner, Doldrums can be a little bit more painful to cross, since the area of squalls is at the same latitude as the equatorial calms, with little wind to escape from these big cells. As usual, the doldrums are narrower on the west and the area gets wider as you get closer to Africa.

Once the doldrums crossed, you enter the southeasterly trades. The more eastern you cross though, the more you will be able to open the sheets afterwards in these trades. It will be close to the beginning of the Austral summer, as the fleet will sail at reaching angles to Recife.

Recife – Abu Dhabi: 9,707 nm

Gonzalo Infante:
The longest and most diverse leg of this 12th edition, it will go from the hot Tropics to the freezing Southern Ocean and back to the heat again in Abu Dhabi.

You have two options to start with: rounding the St. Helena High to catch the Southern Ocean westerlies or cutting its corner. When you round it, the South America lows push you very quickly towards the Roaring Forties. In any case, the goal is to catch these westerlies as soon as possible before heading east fast. Obviously that course will depend a lot from the ice limits.

The next challenge is to pick the right moment to head north again. The transition from the Westerlies in the Southern Indian Ocean to the northern trades of the South Pacific High is a tricky one. It’s difficult to go from westerly to easterly winds! If you get too close from the high, you may get stuck. But if you stay too far, you will end up doing a lot of upwind sailing.

Then comes another Doldrums crossing. These ones are bigger and more unknown than the Atlantic doldrums. The Indian Ocean is very different from the Atlantic one… This crossing can change whatever has been done until this point. Like Groupama last time, you can lose it all by being at the wrong place at the wrong time – the story of life!

After the Doldrums you have to sail upwind from Cape Comorin up to 500 miles off Hormuz in the monsoon winds. Once closer to the Gulf of Oman, you enter in some kind of no man's land between the Arabian Sea and the Gulf, where the wind is very unstable. With the Shamal wind’s help, you can finally blast towards Abu Dhabi.

Abu Dhabi – Sanya: 4,670 nm

Gonzalo Infante:
The highlights of this leg are evocative of some very exotic Easter travel - leaving the Emirates for India, Malacca and Singapore, choosing between Borneo or Vietnam and finally the Hainan island in China.

The start is the inverse of the previous leg: reaching towards Hormuz before entering a transition area and sailing downwind in the monsoon. Once you cut the corner of Cape Comorin, the northeasterly trades are still there but they are weaker. The monsoon winds shift at the Equator. You have to decide if you prefer to go a little bit more south and get a better angle. But all in all it usually is a bit light for such gains to make the difference.

Usually, as you get closer to Malacca, the wind shifts to north northeasterly and you have to decide where to tack. You don’t want to dive too far south on the Sumatra lee side neither. It’s a very tactical approach.

Malacca is a very random place with a generally light wind. The Equator is not far and there are a lot of navigation hazards. The seabed is not fixed and the navigation charts are not very good in the area. Lots of traffic, lots of land breeze too: every day in Malacca is different! The fact that you sailed there before can actually play against you. The key question is whether to use your experience or be open-minded. I would go for the second option.

Then it’s the Singapore Channel, a very narrow one. There isn’t much room out of the traffic lanes and it’s not good to upset merchant vessels. The first miles in the South China Sea are normally upwind but might also be sailed downwind. Stick to the Malaysia coast instead of the Vietnamese to enjoy the Borneo Vortex breeze if there is any and you might be rewarded. The final beat towards Sanya will most probably be a rough upwind one.
Ubi allii finiverant, inde incipimus nos!

Solitaire
Stabsgefreiter
Stabsgefreiter
Mesaje: 90
Membru din: Joi Iun 23, 2011 2:44 pm

Re: Volvo Ocean Race

Mesaj necitit de Solitaire »

Din cate stiu eu, navigatia cu vele este interzisa in Singapore Channel, desi nici eu n-am respectat regula asta din motive evidente: Yanmar-ul era bandajat si colectam diesel in pahare de plastic sub liniile de combustibil. Malacca si toata Indonezia e, cum se spune mai sus, plina de "navigation hazards." Nu stiu cum se poate face racing acolo, ca vant nu este, iar cand este nu e loc de manevre din cauza miilor de plase pescaresti, vase si pescadoare si FADs (Fish Attracting Devices.)
Deci, concluzia e ca acum, in timpuri de criza, ne duce nu vantul ci sponsorul. Nu-i nimic, atat timp cat se face ocean racing, e ok, sa mearga la arabi, la chinezi, unde o fi numai sa faca show pentru media si cei de acasa care sunt inspirati de aceasta cursa.
Dar e si putin trist in acelasi timp.

Avatar utilizator
skipper
Flottillenadmiral
Flottillenadmiral
Mesaje: 2563
Membru din: Mar Apr 19, 2011 7:35 pm
Localitate: Bucuresti
Contact:

Re: Volvo Ocean Race

Mesaj necitit de skipper »

Bantuind pe net am dat intr-un cache la Google de un articol scris in 2000 de John Rousmaniere

More Lessons from the Volvo Ocean Race

Grueling conditions in the VOR have led to the development of specific gear innovations and techniques that eventually trickle down to rank-and-file ocean sailors. Above, two crew aboard illbruck grind for the trimmers to keep the German 60-footer moving at a torrid pace.


Whether it’s firsthand or reported by keen observers, there’s no better teacher than experience. Thanks to the Internet, we have much informative (and entertaining) news from sea direct from sailors who have been racing in the grueling Volvo Ocean Race around the world. With their high speeds, stripped-out interiors, crews of 12 professionals, and $15,000 electronics packages, Volvo 60s may seem like a whole dissimilar breed of vessel from the average cruiser-racer, but fundamentally they’re no different. Every crew hoists sails one at a time and navigates in the same ancient, sometimes risky interface between water and air.


Here are a few lessons-confirmed and lessons-learned from the first six legs of the Volvo Race, most of them conveyed by the race’s website, but a few passed on by my friend and shipmate Chris Huntington who sailed aboard one of the spare boats during the Miami-Baltimore leg.

First, have a decent vessel. In that regard the preamble to the Volvo 60 Rule could not be more clear: "The need for safety and self-sufficiency is paramount. The Rule is intended to foster gradual design development leading to easily driven, seaworthy boats of high stability, requiring moderate crew numbers." As quick and demanding as these boats may be, they’re not inherently dangerous, like the weird, dinghy-like 60-footers that single-handers used to sail. Under the Rule, the range of positive stability—the heel angle at which a boat will still pop back upright—has to be at least 142 degrees, which is extremely high for any boat. Hulls must be built of Kevlar, which is more impact-resistant than carbon fiber (carbon is used in spars, however). There has to be a breakaway bow in case of a head-on collision, and each boat has four watertight bulkheads to allow the crew to isolate bad leaks around the rudder post, the bow, and areas in between.


Take good pumps. Water is a constant shipmate when these boats are at speed. "Brother, is it wet," reported one of the most experienced sailors, Grant Dalton, skipper of Amer Sports One, from the Southern Ocean. "It would be impossible for the boat to be any wetter. We bail it (literally) every two hours maximum and the water just pours over the deck. This is not your average heavy spray, more walls of white water which eventually penetrate through everything and through all of this the boat continues to thunder along, now under small spinnaker in a confused sea."


Prepare for emergencies. With such forces, it would be irresponsible not to plan for emergencies. "It is as safe as you're going to get without making it impossible to sail the boats," Andy Hindley, the Volvo Ocean Race's Yacht Equipment and Racing Manager, told Mad for Sailing. The race’s long list of required safety gear was developed from the Offshore Special Regulations, the international standards for racing monohulls and multihulls. (A valuable guide for anybody heading out there, the Special Regs are available from the US Sailing Association for $15, $10 for members, at http://www.ussailing.org/safety" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;.)

The Volvo Rule sometimes is more demanding even than the Special Regs. Each boat must have two 12-person liferafts painted orange—top and bottom—to improve their visibility from aircraft, plus two survival packs (each with an ACR PathFinder2 search-and-rescue transponder, whose signal can be read on rescuers’ radar screens). Every boat carries five emergency beacons, and each sailor wears a McMurdo Guardian crew-overboard beacon—a device so compact that it’s built into a wristwatch. Chris Huntington tells me that every boat also carries on the stern a crew-overboard canister that, when it’s tossed in, emits a light for two hours and smoke for 15 minutes.


Secure your gear. In hard going soon after the start, illbruck’s sewing machine for repairing sails flew off its mounts and severed an intake hose above the seacock. The resulting leak was characterized by one crew member as "a miniature Trevi Fountain in the forepeak." The hole was quickly plugged with a pine plug.

Adapt to the conditions. So much for hardware, now let’s look at seamanship. Even these aggressive crews nurse their boats a little. "The sea state is the biggest factor in riding out a gale and this sea is very nasty indeed," Team Tyco reported from the middle of a blow. "It has no uniform pattern and since we have just moved into the dark hours, the helmsman has an even harder time of steering a smooth course through the waves. He is not driving for maximum speed right now, but to balance our heading with a reasonable speed without stressing the boat too much."

Hook on. "We had need of every finger God had given us," Richard Henry Dana, Jr., wrote in Two Years before the Mast about a trip aloft in a square rigger near Cape Horn. More than 160 years later, djuice dragons skipper Knut Frostad said as much in an e-mail, referring to one crucial piece of gear that provides not just an extra finger but an entire third hand. Everybody in the Volvo Race has a safety harness integral with an auto-inflating PFD. One day Frostad reported, "Changing headsails in more than 40 knots is probably the most difficult and dangerous change we have. Six guys hooked on with safety lines on the bow, trying to pull down and in the old jib. The boat is still logging up to 20 knots and suddenly a wave washes the bow, pushing the six big guys back at high speed. Then they crawl forward and start all over again pulling the jib in. Soaking wet, but still smiling, we crawl back together in the cockpit."

Be self-sufficient. Four boats lost rudders and one was dismasted, and all made their own way to port. The rudder failures were pretty typical: two broken rudder stocks, one failed lower bearing, and a blade that disintegrated after it was hit hard by some ice. Those boats made it to port under transom-hung emergency rudders that were required by the rules.

When SEB was dismasted well west of Cape Horn, the crew wasted no time in erecting a jury-rigged mast and got their boat safely to Rio de Janeiro in time to rejoin the race.
The dismasting occurred one night 1,250 miles west of Cape Horn. While surfing under spinnaker at a speed of 25 knots—that’s boat speed—Team SEB was hit by an abrupt wind shift in a snow squall. She broached to leeward, jibed, and was heaved over on her side, dragging the mast in the water until it broke off just above the boom. The crew cleared away the rigging mess with bolt cutters. They carefully did not turn on the engine until after dawn, when there was enough light to allow a careful inspection to check that nothing fouled the propeller. A jury rig got her to port.

And again I say, Hook on! In another wild broach, ASSA ABLOY was thrown onto her side. Richard Mason later reminisced about what he called "a heart-stopping moment": "Saw the wave coming, grabbed hold of the grinder pedestal, only to be ripped off, washed over the main sheet through the stacking gear and get pinned under the water. If I hadn't been clipped on I wouldn't be writing this. Stu Wilson, who was also on deck at the time, ended up in the water with me. He had only been clipped on by another crew member seconds earlier....Incidentally, the spinnaker stayed set through the whole wipe out, we popped up and surfed away as if nothing had happened. I can assure you that there were a few knees knocking around the boat after the incident."


Expect discomfort. Many of these extremely experienced pros were surprised by seasickness. "I haven't been seasick for years, but in the first leg I came down badly in the Bay of Biscay," Emma Westmacott wrote in from the women’s boat, Amer Sports Too. "It's a feeling that you just want to jump off the side of the boat and end it all. It's miserable, you don't feel like doing anything, you get lethargic and you get tired....It is just an ever-decreasing circle. It is something that you have to combat early or accept the fact that you have a problem with it." And hang on.

Anticipate humility. When a waterspout meandered through the fleet in the Sydney-Hobart Race, a leg in the Volvo Race, according to skipper Gurra Krantz of Team SEB, "It looked like a gigantic vacuum cleaner coming down to suck away all the tiny boats littering the water." As the wind accelerated to 65 knots in a matter of seconds, even extremely experienced sailors were intimidated. "We had a helpless feeling where this freak of nature was chasing us down," said illbruck’s skipper, John Kostecki, who after several frustrated evasive maneuvers succeeded in avoiding the spout by only 200 yards.

Be ready for medical problems. The race rules required boats to carry at least two trained medics, and they were backed up by a shoreside team of doctors providing advice over the radio and Internet. The system worked. On Leg Two, an onboard medic, Dr. Roger Nilson of Amer Sports One, diagnosed what had first appeared to be a shipmate’s case of indigestion as an intestinal blockage and arranged to have Keith Kilpatrick airlifted off the boat.

Otherwise, bodily battering was constant. "The human is the vulnerable part of these boats now, not the boat itself," said Grant Dalton, who hurt his back in a fall. News Corp’s syndicate head Ross Field reported, "Every crew on every boat has got injuries. It is the most injuries I’ve seen. On our boat there are guys with sprains and crook shoulders." It was all due to pushing hard: "We had [the boat] fully wound out and it just physically punishes the guys. And it doesn’t matter how much training or weight lifting you do, you are not going to stop yourself from being battered around, the only thing it does help is your recovery rate. So you can get into port and you can recover and get on with the next leg."

Accept that mistakes happen. Chris described the start at Miami in which six of the eight boats were over the line early: "The chaos, screaming, and yelling on some of the boats rivaled some of the worst weekend-duffer conduct I’ve ever seen: sails wrapped around shrouds, tacking without switching the runners, and general mayhem. Funny, from a distance. And perhaps comforting that even the most experienced guys get fouled up."


And savor the simple pleasures. To save weight, on the first leg, which passed through temperate climates, skippers limited their crews to foul-weather gear, a hat, one pair each of shoes and socks, and a couple of T-shirts and shorts. "We get to bring a toothbrush, but they supply the toothpaste," said Keith Kilpatrick, who most regretted the absence of music because Walkman-type CD players were out. "One of the toughest things for me will be 30 days without music. It’ll be silence, and sleep when I can."


But sailors are adept at getting the best out of even the bleakest situations. "Apart from the wind direction and the lack of it between rain squalls, life is pretty sweet," Bridget Suckling reported early on the first leg from Amer Sports Too. "We have plenty of toilet paper, chicken curry on a Sunday night, one wet wipe per day, and at least two hours sleep on your off watch." Ah, the joys!
Ubi allii finiverant, inde incipimus nos!

Avatar utilizator
skipper
Flottillenadmiral
Flottillenadmiral
Mesaje: 2563
Membru din: Mar Apr 19, 2011 7:35 pm
Localitate: Bucuresti
Contact:

Re: Volvo Ocean Race

Mesaj necitit de skipper »

Michel Desjoyeaux, de doua ori invingator in Vendee Globe, se duce sef de cart la Team Campos in VOR care sta sa inceapa, acceptand ca skipper pe Iker Martinez.
Je regarde tout cela et j’apprends. J’apprends tous les jours !
Chapeau, professeur!
Ubi allii finiverant, inde incipimus nos!

Avatar utilizator
skipper
Flottillenadmiral
Flottillenadmiral
Mesaje: 2563
Membru din: Mar Apr 19, 2011 7:35 pm
Localitate: Bucuresti
Contact:

Re: Volvo Ocean Race

Mesaj necitit de skipper »

Nasol!

Michel Desjoyeaux : «Pourquoi je débarque de Mapfre ?»

Pour son retour dans la Volvo Ocean Race, trente ans après sa première participation avec un certain Éric Tabarly sur Côte d’or, Michel Desjoyeaux – chef de quart sur Mapfre – a préféré jeter l’éponge en accord avec Iker Martinez, le skipper du VO65 espagnol, et ce dès la fin de la première étape. Nicolas Lunven – le navigateur – a fait de même. Explications sans détours par le double vainqueur du Vendée Globe, à son retour d’Afrique du Sud.



v&v.com : Comment s’est déroulée cette longue première étape entre Alicante et Le Cap, avec plus de 8 000 milles parcourus sur le fond ?
Michel Desjoyeaux : C’est parti très vite, avec des changements de leaders plusieurs fois par jour. Ça distribuait pas mal ! Il y a eu rapidement des options assez franches et un Port au Noir inhabituel. Du coup, il y avait pas mal de doutes dans la flotte et il a fallu choisir pour sortir du Pot quasiment avant le passage du Cap Vert… Et avec toute l’incertitude qui va avec. Pas simple !



v&v.com : Et dans l’Atlantique Sud, l’anticyclone de Sainte-Hélène ne vous a pas épargnés ?
M.D. : C’est le moins qu’on puisse dire ! Il était à la fois très Sud et super étendu… De plus, la fin de l’étape n’était pas claire du tout. D’ailleurs, d’un jour sur l’autre, les routages faisaient prendre des routes totalement différentes. Si on ajoute que la direction de course a mis une «ice box» (porte des glaces, ndlr) au milieu de l’Atlantique Sud – car à un moment, on était tous amenés à pouvoir descendre par 48 ou 49 Sud –, ça a été compliqué… Humide et froid. Heureusement, nous avions les équipements pour naviguer sous ces latitudes. Merci TBS ! Nous avons fini dans de l’air, mais dans des conditions plus agréables. Mais j’ai rarement vu des trajectoires aussi complexes et peu académiques !



v&v.com : Sur Mapfre, vous avez connu des soucis techniques ?
M.D. : Pas autant que sur Dongfeng, mais quand même quelques-uns. Nous avons un peu abîmé deux voiles la dernière nuit et on a aussi cassé un câble sur le A3 – une espèce de spi que je n’aime pas – plus quelques bricoles classiques en course. Mais rien de rédhibitoire.



v&v.com : Tu confirmes les quelques aberrations que tu avais mentionnées lors de la visite du bateau, que nous avions tournée l’avant-veille du départ ?
M.D. : (Rires.) On finit par s’habituer à tout, même à des winches qui tournent à l’envers. Mais c’est vrai qu’il y a des trucs avec lesquels j’ai un peu de mal. Je dois être un peu trop vieux jeu, trop conservateur. Pour moi, un winch tourne dans le sens des aiguilles d’une montre ! Mais bon, comme nous avons tous le même bateau, c’est à nous de nous adapter en conséquence.



Petit moralL'arrivée au Cap de Mapfre, en dernière position des VO65, couronne une première étape compliquée pour les Espagnols... À bien des égards.Photo @ María Muina Mapfre / Volvo Ocean Race

v&v.com : Venons-en au fait que tu débarques : pourquoi ?
M.D. : Pourquoi je débarque ? C’est assez simple. Je fais de la course au large depuis 35 ans et ma conception de la façon de mener un équipage n’est pas compatible avec celle d’Iker (Martinez ; ndr) qui est le skipper, donc le maître. Je ne veux pas m’étendre. Iker est un ami. Nous avons bossé ensemble lorsqu’il a loué et préparé Foncia pour la dernière Barcelona World Race qu’il a couru avec Xabi Fernandez (ils ont fini deuxièmes, derrière Jean-Pierre Dick et Loïck Peyron ; ndlr). Mais quand il y a de la fatigue de la tension accumulée, les choses peuvent déraper… Et ça a été le cas !



v&v.com : Vous n’étiez pas en phase ?
M.D. : Disons que quand tu commences à être considéré comme un «ennemi» sous prétexte que tu émets un avis différent, ce n’est jamais très bon sur un bateau de course, en équipage. Mais ce sont des choses qui arrivent souvent sur ce type de courses – des exemples il y en a plein. Il suffit de lire la bio de Franck Cammas qui vient de sortir ! ("J'ai mis les voiles pour gagner", co-écrit avec Patrice Gabard, aux éditions City ; ndlr.)



v&v.com : Des blogueurs très observateurs sur Sailing Anarchy ont noté que tu n’étais pas sur le pont avec tout l’équipage au moment où Mapfre est rentré au port. Tu faisais la tête ?
M.D. : (Rires.) Non, absolument pas ! J’étais simplement à l’intérieur en train d’actionner manuellement la commande moteur à l’aide de deux bouts, car : un, nous avons sans doute cramé un composant après avoir pris la foudre la première nuit ; deux, c’est moi qui avais mis en place ce dispositif de dépannage ; et trois, sinon on risquait de se crasher sur le quai ! D’ailleurs une fois au ponton, je suis sorti rejoindre mes camarades.





v&v.com : Et Nicolas Lunven dans tout ça ?
M.D. : Déjà, Nico était très assimilé à moi, même si lui et Iker se connaissaient et s'appréciaient avant que je ne le propose. Ils ont même failli faire la Trasat Ag2r ensemble. On s’est bien entendu, on a beaucoup échangé… Et j’ai assez vite compris qu’il ne fallait pas que je m’immisce dans la discussion sur la stratégie entre lui et Iker. Et il est vrai que quand nous avons tous les deux été amenés à choisir l’option autour du Cap Vert, nous nous sommes plantés... Mais ça fait partie du jeu du navigateur de se planter. Du coup, j’ai le sentiment que Nico n’avait plus la confiance du skipper et s’est retrouvé assimilé aux erreurs et au mauvais résultat (Mapfre a fini 7e et dernier de la première étape ; ndlr).



Bons amisMichel Desjoyeaux et le skipper de Mapfre Iker Martinez (ici à la barre) se connaissent de longue date et s'apprécient... Mais entre Alicante et Le Cap, cela a coincé.Photo @ María Muina Mapfre / Volvo Ocean Race

v&v.com : Il paraît que la moitié de l’équipage est remerciée ?
M.D. : L’Anglais Sam Goodchild qui est vraiment un mec génial à bord, ainsi que Rafa Trujillo (quatre participations aux Jeux olympiques en Finn et Star, avec une médaille d’argent à Athènes ; ndlr) ne devraient pas naviguer. Pourtant ce dernier est Espagnol… Anthony Marchand, qui est l’un des équipiers de moins de 30 ans, reste à bord. Mais bon, on ne peut pas non plus espérer trouver l’alchimie quand un projet Volvo démarre en mai 2014… Donc très tard. C’est forcement plus compliqué. De plus, on se parlait anglais à bord, alors qu'il n'y avait aucun Anglais. La barrière de la langue ne simplifie pas les relations humaines !



v&v.com : Mais tu continues la course, même sans naviguer ?
M.D. : J’ai amené TBS comme fournisseur officiel et de fait, je vais continuer à m’impliquer avec mon fidèle partenaire technique, car on doit juste un peu modifier la façon de raconter cette belle histoire qui dure depuis 19 ans. Je ne suis pas fâché avec Iker, mais ne retournerai pas à bord tant qu’il sera là. Et je ne suis pas certain qu’il souhaite que je prenne sa place, quand il ne disputera pas certaines étapes pour cause de préparation olympique en Nacra 17. Je tourne la page Volvo. Je ne suis ni le premier ni le dernier…



v&v.com : C’est toi qui a proposé à Jean-Luc Nélias de remplacer Nicolas Lunven ?
M.D. : Non. Jean-Luc – fort de son expérience de navigateur sur Groupama 4 lors de la dernière édition – travaillait déjà avec Nico sur la préparation des étapes et les briefings d’avant course, à sa demande. Ce n'est donc pas surprenant qu'Iker lui ait proposé d'occuper désormais le poste de navigateur. Et j'ai appris que l’Anglais Rob Greenhalgh – trois Volvo au compteur ! – me remplace comme chef de quart... Cela serait bien qu'ils retrouvent du plaisir à naviguer. La suite viendra alors !



Meilleur à venirLe Team France de la Coupe de l'America et d'autres projets engagés vont désormais occuper Desjoyeaux, qui reste par ailleurs au sein de l'équipe Mapfre, ayant "apporté" son partenaire TBS au projet.Photo @ Francisco Vignale Mapfre / Volvo Ocean Race

v&v.com : Du coup, tu vas faire quoi ?
M.D. : Je vais pouvoir me réinvestir à fond dans Team France. Denis Juhel a bien tenu la barque pendant ce temps-là. Et j’ai d’autres projets qui continuent de se mettre en place. Mer Agitée avance bien, Mer Forte aussi, et comme tout était organisé pour que cela fonctionne sans moi, je vais peut-être (enfin) pouvoir prendre du temps pour moi !



v&v.com : Tu as suivi la Route du Rhum ?
M.D. : De très loin. On n’a pas le droit à internet à bord des VO 65 donc nous n’avons eu que quelques pointages au compte-goutte, envoyés par la direction de course ou la famille.



v&v.com : Quel est ton sentiment sur l’issue de cette 10e édition ?
M.D. : Vu les conditions météo (on n'avait pas toutes les infos de la course, mais on pouvait prendre des fichiers sur l'Atlantique Nord), je ne suis pas surpris de ce podium et que le record soit tombé. Les deux premiers Banque Populaire VII et Spindrift 2 ont été bien servis par la météo. Je trouve super que Jojo (Seb Josse ; ndlr) soit resté aussi proche de ces deux-là. J’aurais tendance à dire que c’est le plus méritant des sept ultimes – et il a beaucoup bossé pour ça. Après, bravo à Lolo (Loïck Peyron ; ndlr) ! Prendre le truc deux mois avant et sur un tel bateau, ce n’est pas simple, surtout quand on n'a pas un physique de déménageur ! Mais que de talent ! Enfin, ce qu’a réalisé Yann (Guichard ; ndlr) est courageux, donc largement mérité. Mais je ne me serais pas vu mener un bateau de 40 mètres en solo. Un 30 mètres pourquoi pas ? Mais de toute manière, traverser l’Atlantique en solo sur un multicoque – même petit ! –, ce n’est pas rien ! Mais beaucoup de gens ont tendance à l'occulter. Côté mono, François (Gabart ; ndlr) a géré ça de main de maître. Rien à dire !
Ubi allii finiverant, inde incipimus nos!

Avatar utilizator
skipper
Flottillenadmiral
Flottillenadmiral
Mesaje: 2563
Membru din: Mar Apr 19, 2011 7:35 pm
Localitate: Bucuresti
Contact:

Re: Volvo Ocean Race

Mesaj necitit de skipper »

Ceva interesant: ce unelte foloseste un navigator la borul unei barci VOR.
Sa luam aminte!

Ma trousse à outils !
Nicolas Lunven a pris le départ le dimanche 10 décembre de la troisième étape de la Volvo Ocean Race 2017-2018 à bord de Turn The Tide On Plastic, skippé par la britannique Dee Caffari et qui occupe actuellement la 7e place du général. Au programme l'océan Indien Sud pour 6 500 milles de course intense entre Le Cap (Afrique du Sud) et Melbourne (Australie). Navigateur du bord, notre chroniqueur de luxe explique par le menu tous les outils qu'il utilise pour effectuer sa tâche. Il n'a pas de quoi s'ennuyer...

L’électronique

L’électronique est monotype sur tous les bateaux de la flotte : WTP de chez B&G. le WTP est une version custom de la centrale B&G, c’est-à-dire que l’on a accès au cœur du système pour pouvoir le paramétrer à sa guise. On peut quasiment faire tout ce que l’on veut, à condition de savoir s’en servir convenablement… Il y a un nombre très important de capteurs : 3 GPS, 3 compas, 2 aérien, 4 speedos, un sondeur, des capteurs de charge et de réglage un peu partout sur le gréement, un baromètre, un thermomètre, bref, il y a de quoi s’amuser, une véritable usine !

L’informatique

Les ordinateurs sont également monotypes, au nombre de deux, mais on peut installer ce que l’on veut comme outils dessus. Nous sommes obligés de faire tourner Deckman en permanence à cause du WTP mais je ne m’en sers uniquement pour avoir accès au WTP (calibration, choix des capteurs, lissage des données, etc…). Voici les autres logiciels que j’utilise sur «Turn The Tide On Plastic» :

Adrena est mon outil de travail principal : cartographie, navigation, météo, stratégie, aide à la performance, on peut presque tout faire avec ! Je le maîtrise bien car je l’utilise depuis de nombreuses années et le dialogue avec l’équipe de développement est aisé. C’est à mon sens le logiciel qui aujourd’hui est le plus abouti, le plus performant et le plus puissant. Sans lui je suis perdu !

Imagine

J’utilise également un peu Expedition, mais plus comme garde-fou.
Il présente quelques fonctionnalités intéressantes mais cela reste marginal. Les deux logiciels ont un fonctionnement assez proche donc il n’est pas trop compliqué de passer de l’un à l’autre. Il y a quelques temps je me suis glissé dans la peau d’un apprenti ingénieur informaticien pour bricoler quelques passerelles entre les deux logiciels afin de pouvoir transférer les résultats des routages obtenus avec Expedition sur Adrena et de pouvoir comparer les deux.

Nous utilisons aussi Wind Bag qui est un petit outil qui permet de tracker des cibles AIS sous forme de tableur. On rentre le numéro MMSI des bateaux de la flotte et on a les valeurs (SOG et COG) qui sont calculées et lissées dans le temps. Cela permet de savoir si on est plus ou moins rapides que les copains. Cet outil est terriblement addictif car on a tendance à avoir les yeux rivés sur l’écran pour savoir si on atteint les 100% de performance par rapport aux autres bateaux. Evidemment, cela ne marche que lorsque nous sommes à portée d’AIS, c’est-à-dire environ 7-8 milles maximum pour des Volvo 65.

Ensuite, autre logiciel qui tourne en permanence à bord : «On Board Assistant» de Sailing Performance. Ce logiciel permet de faire de l’acquisition de données en provenance de la centrale avec en plus les configurations de voiles, de ballast, de dérive, de position de matossage, d’outrigger et tout autre paramètre qui nous semble pertinent d’intégrer à l’analyse de performance. A la fin de chaque session de navigation, toutes ces données sont traitées à l’aide d’autres logiciels toujours de chez Sailing performance pour permettre d’améliorer notre connaissance du bateau (quelles sont les configurations les plus performantes ?) et ensuite d’affiner nos polaires et nos sailects.

Enfin, j’utilise un petit logiciel qui permet de comparer des fichiers Grib entre eux ainsi qu’avec les données enregistrées par la centrale : quel modèle météo est le plus proche de la réalité que nous avons vécu ? Pendant combien de temps la prévision est-elle généralement fiable ? L’idée est ici de pouvoir apporter du crédit à un modèle plus qu’à un autre à l’aide de chiffres concrets, d’éléments tangibles.

Et enfin, en plus de tout cela, j’ai un écran déporté (Ipad dans un caisson étanche) dont je me sers uniquement sur les départs et les parties «In-Port» des étapes, avec un écran Adrena spécifique pour les départs (avantage de la ligne, timing, etc…), puis , une fois en course, le temps jusqu’aux laylines, jusqu’à la prochaine marque, le cap et la distance du prochain bord, l’angle par rapport au vent, la voile idéale, etc…

Les outils météo

La société Great Circle, via son logiciel Squid, est le fournisseur exclusif de la Volvo Ocean Race. Nous avons un quota de 0.5 GB de téléchargement de données par étape.

Chaque navigateur est libre de télécharger les données qu’il veut via Squid, tant qu’il ne dépasse le quota : cartes isobariques, fichiers Grib, observations, images satellites, scatterometer (observation du vent par satellite). De nombreuses données sont disponibles. A chacun de faire son choix et ensuite de les traiter.

Les classements

Nous recevons toutes les 6 heures un fichier avec la position des concurrents. On intègre ce fichier à Adrena pour les visualiser à l’écran, savoir si nous avons gagné ou perdu du terrain, etc… On peut également simuler des routages pour nos concurrents pour savoir si une option différente de la nôtre s’avère payante ou non.

Bref, il y a de quoi s’occuper !
Ubi allii finiverant, inde incipimus nos!

Avatar utilizator
skipper
Flottillenadmiral
Flottillenadmiral
Mesaje: 2563
Membru din: Mar Apr 19, 2011 7:35 pm
Localitate: Bucuresti
Contact:

Re: Volvo Ocean Race

Mesaj necitit de skipper »

Cum ar fi ca o barca de la VOR sa fie buna si la Vendee Globe? Ba mai mult, compatibila cu clasa IMOCA!
Asa s-a anuntat!


#1 LA VOLVO OCEAN RACE PASSE OFFICIELLEMENT À L'IMOCA

Sept mois de réflexion
Il aura fallu environ sept mois pour aboutir à un accord. Un accord qui n’aurait sans doute pas eu lieu, en tout cas pas si vite, sans la « porte ouverte » - dixit Antoine Mermod, président de l’Imoca - par Mark Turner, qui, en mai 2017, avait annoncé le passage de la Volvo Ocean Race, dont il était alors le CEO, au Super Sixty, un 60 pieds "compatible" avec la jauge Imoca. Si ce dernier s'est vu opposer une fin de non recevoir de l’Imoca - avant de démissionner -, les ponts n’ont pas été rompus entre la Volvo et l’Imoca, qui ont repris langue à l'automne dernier.

« Nous nous sommes rencontrés en novembre avec Johan Salén [qui a succédé, avec Richard Brisius, à Mark Turner, avant de racheter début juin la Volvo avec leur société Atlant, NDLR]. L’objet était juste d’analyser ce qui marchait et ne marchait pas d’un côté comme de l’autre et nous avons très vite fait le constat qu’on avait chacun des événements dingues, mais qu'il était compliqué pour les teams de trouver de l’argent pour y participer de façon correcte. A partir de là, on s’est dit que ce n’était pas délirant de travailler ensemble pour créer un modèle solide et valorisable et aboutir à un réservoir de dix-quinze équipes vivant bien de nos deux histoires », explique Antoine Mermod.

Chacun a ensuite planché de son côté sur ce projet commun, devenu concret mi-mars avant d’être adopté fin avril par l’AG de l’Imoca à une très large majorité. Un moment-clé pour Antoine Mermod : « A 51/49, on n’y allait pas ». La procédure de rachat de la Volvo Ocean Race a mis les discussions en stand-by, elles ont repris et abouti mi-juin, le partenariat ayant été signé ce vendredi à midi pour deux éditions de la Volvo entre les nouveaux propriétaires de la course et Antoine Mermod après avoir été présenté la veille aux équipes. L'annonce officielle, qui aurait dû intervenir aujourd'hui, a été repoussée à lundi en raison de la collision mortelle qui a endeuillé le port de La Haye jeudi soir.

Première Volvo Ocean Race en Imoca à l'automne 2021
Si les termes précis de l’accord qui lie la Volvo et l’Imoca seront dévoilés lundi par communiqué de presse, la principale information est que la douzième édition de la Volvo Ocean Race aura lieu en 2021-2022 sur des 60 pieds Imoca existants ou neufs avec sans doute des équipages de cinq marins. Pourquoi cette date ? « Pour la Volvo Ocean Race, ce n’était pas possible avant ; pour nous, le choix était entre 2021 et 2022. La Route du Rhum étant une épreuve très importante pour les Français, nous avons choisi 2021, pour un départ vraisemblablement à l'automne. La seule course en concurrence sera la Transat Jacques-Vabre. Mais, sur les 30 bateaux qui font le Vendée Globe, s'il y en a 5 qui partent faire la Volvo, il restera encore un beau plateau potentiel au Havre », répond Antoine Mermod.

L’accord entre les deux parties comporte-t-il également un volet financier ? « Dans la mesure où l’Imoca apporte un service, c’est-à-dire un certain nombre d’expertises techniques et sa flotte, mais aussi prend quelques engagements, il y a une contrepartie financière, comme il en existe avec d’autres courses, comme le Vendée Globe [qui verse 80 000 euros chaque année à l'Imoca, NDLR] », répond le président de l’Imoca. Le montant ? « Confidentiel ».

Une « crew section » dans la jauge annoncée en fin d’année
La veille de la signature du partenariat ont eu lieu à La Haye deux réunions essentiellement techniques autour du projet. La première a réuni les patrons de la Volvo - accompagnés de leur « shore team » mené par Nick Bice -, les architectes qui construisent aujourd’hui des Imoca - Vincent Lauriot-Prévost et Quentin Lucet pour VPLP, Guillaume Verdier, Juan Kouyoumdjian et Sam Manuard - des représentants des sociétés GSea Design et Gurit, ainsi qu’Antoine Mermod et Vincent Riou – « On m’a demandé de venir partager mon expérience », explique ce dernier, qui fut longtemps le responsable de la commission technique de l'Imoca. "L’objet de cette réunion était d’évaluer ensemble si les accords signés avaient du sens et de trouver des solutions techniques. Nous avons tous été plutôt d’accord pour dire que les deux programmes étaient compatibles, à quelques détails près", précise Vincent Lauriot-Prévost.

Le projet a ensuite été présenté aux teams de cette édition lors d’un « educational meeting » qui a essentiellement consisté en un questions-réponses d’ordre technique. « Comme ils sont encore tout feu tout flamme de leur dernière édition dont le résultat final s’est joué dans les dernières minutes, ils voulaient savoir s’il y aurait toujours des régates au contact et si on pouvait leur garantir qu’on n’allait pas casser en tirant sur les Imoca », poursuit Vincent Lauriot-Prévost. Autant de questions dont les réponses dépendront des adaptations de la jauge : dans les six mois à venir, l’Imoca et la Volvo Ocean Race vont en effet travailler via une commission bipartite à la rédaction d’une « crew section » de la jauge existante, spécifiquement pour la Volvo 2021. La jauge actuelle ne sera pas modifiée sur les autres points d’ici le prochain Vendée Globe.

« L’objectif principal, c’est qu’un bateau qui fait le Vendée Globe 2020 puisse être compétitif pour la Volvo 2021 ; l’idée n’est pas de changer mais de s’adapter aux problématiques de l’équipage », explique Antoine Mermod, une problématique à laquelle tiennent particulièrement les skippers. « La force de l’Imoca a toujours été de faire évoluer ses règles en faisant en sorte de conserver la flotte existante, ce sera encore le cas », confirme Vincent Riou. Cette « crew section » sera dévoilée en fin d’année. Quid des éditions suivantes ? « Pour la campagne suivante, des discussions auront lieu en 2019-2020 pour être validées après le Vendée Globe 2020 », ajoute le président de l’Imoca.

Quel impact pour l’Imoca ?
Certains skippers s'inquiètent d'un risque d'inflation des budgets liés à ce rapprochement. Pour Antoine Mermod, ce contrat n’a que des avantages : « On va pouvoir réunir sur les deux plus grandes courses du monde, dans la même catégorie, les meilleurs Français et les meilleurs marins du monde, des champions olympiques, des vainqueurs de la Coupe… Et pour une course comme le Vendée Globe, c’est l’occasion à la fois d’augmenter la notoriété à l'étranger et d’attirer plus de skippers internationaux ». Moins exalté, Vincent Riou y voit, de manière prosaïque, une victoire symbolique pour l’Imoca : « C’est enthousiasmant, le début d’une belle aventure. Pour nous, c’est le modèle de la Volvo qui se rapproche de notre modèle et non l’inverse. C’est une satisfaction quand tu as participé à tout mettre en place. Maintenant, ça ne va pas être un long fleuve tranquille... ».

Il y a en effet du travail en perspective, en particulier au sein même de l’Imoca, appelée à se structurer davantage, techniquement et juridiquement. « Forcément, on va se renforcer, ça va nous demander un vrai investissement. C’est un énorme boost pour nous, c’est passionnant de se lancer là-dedans », confirme Antoine Mermod. Le rapprochement entre Volvo Ocean Race et Imoca pourrait également accélérer le développement de certaines écuries impliquées en Imoca, à l'heure où elles se structurent et se professionnalisent. « Nous avons une structure sportive et technique en train de développer un Imoca, qui aurait donc le potentiel pour travailler sur un Imoca version Volvo, avance Jérémie Beyou, auréolé se sa victoire avec Dongfeng. Nous avons le savoir-faire, un bureau d’études qui connaît parfaitement la jauge et le développement de ces bateaux : pourquoi pas travailler pour une équipe ? »
Ubi allii finiverant, inde incipimus nos!

Scrie răspuns