Cupa Americii

Despre cursele de barci, regate, raliuri, transaturi, et caetera
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Re: Cupa Americii

Mesaj necitit de skipper »

Cursele se pot urmari live pe Youtube:

http://www.youtube.com/user/AmericasCup" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;


Si exista si un fel de desen animat in timp real care ajuta la intelegerea situatiei:

http://americascup.virtualeye.tv/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
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Re: Cupa Americii

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Parerea kiwiotilor despre cowboy exprimata de Dean Barker la conferinta de presa de aseara:

These guys (ORACLE TEAM USA) are sailing well enough that you don’t have a chance to get past them.
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Re: Cupa Americii

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Eu tot nu pricep:

-cum au reusit sa ia americanii 8 curse consecutive si kiwiotii niciuna
-cum de tocmai cand sa castige si kiwiotii s-au anulat vreo 3 curse
-cum de barca USA mergea mai repede decat a kiwiotilor si cu o diferenta de 5nd la vant de travers pana la baliza 1
-cum de kiwiotii au facut asemeena greseli majore cum ar fi voltele in plus in antepenultima cursa sau ramasul in irons la start.

Pareri?
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Re: Cupa Americii

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Parerea celor de la Sail World:

The following notes are circulating in Auckland media circles, as an explanation for Oracle Team USA's improved foiling performance, as time progressed in the 34th America's Cup.

The notes were dated September 23, 2013, but were received by Sail-World mid-morning September 26, after the regatta had finished.

This afternoon, an Oracle spokesman said that the team used the same set of foils through the regatta and that the 'special foil adjuster system, was there before the regatta started'.

The matter was taken by Emirates Team NZ to the International Jury on September 3, and a Decision issued on September 6, just one day before the regatta started. It was rejected on the basis on being filed outside the allowable time, but added a rider, that had it been issued inside the time limit, but on the basis of what had been heard, the application would have been unlikely to have been upheld.

Emirates Team NZ's Ray Davies said 'their boat is rock steady up wind, that takes us a lot of effort, and we have been trying to it for a long, long time, and yet they master it in just a few days.

It is well recognised that Oracle was having serious foiling stability difficulties at the outset of the regatta and that their performance could not match that of ETNZ.

Half way through the series it was acknowledged that Oracle had fitted an automatic control to their hydrofoil trim, and that this modification was approved by the measurement authorities.

Since this modification Oracle's performance has almost unbelievably improved. This has been 'explained' by skipper Jimmy Spithill as being due to the superhuman efforts of the crew to improve their handling skills. However, in view of the intensive training Oracle were able to do, prior to the regatta, with their highly skilled team partner, it seems unlikely that only now have they discovered the 'magic bullet' they they clearly have. It is much more likely to be the result of the modifications, possibly enabled by their surprising decision to use their lay day card and the subsequent lucky postponements.

It must be remembered that this is the first time that this contest has been sailed by yachts 'flying ' on Hydrofoils and it is probable that new and different criteria should have been applied.

In the aeronautical world it has long been known that the stability of swept wing aircraft can rapidly be lost by uncontrolled yaw leading to a dangerous situation known as 'Dutch Roll'.

A device known as 'Little Herbie' was developed during the commissioning of the Boeing 747 Jumbo Jets over 40 years ago, to over come this tendency. Little Herbies, or 'Stability Augmentation Systems' (SAS) as these are now designated, are equipped with sensors such as Accelerometers and Gyros which can detect and instigate corrections to stability with a speed and accuracy which exceeds the ability of even experienced airline pilots. They are therefore now installed in virtually all swept-wing aircraft.

The 'legality' of this device has been justified and accepted on the basis that it does not actually 'drive' the trim of the foils.....this is still performed by the muscle power of the crew, via hydraulic linkages. That may be so, but the device, using its sensing and directives, has been described as 'automatic'. This implies that the trim of the foils is determined by what can only be described as 'superhuman' technology. If this technology has been used to overcome the foiling stability difficulties of Oracle it will have enabled the use of higher speed/lower drag foils which the crew would otherwise be unable to manage. This would give a significant speed advantage during foiling. This has been clearly in evidence since the modification. Improvement in stability and speed has been staggering.

The high speed/low drag foils do have a downside in light conditions where, due to their lesser lifting characteristic, foiling is difficult or impossible. This was also clearly seen in the abandoned Race 13 when ETNZ were only 4 minutes from the finish, with a lead of over 1000metres.

Oracle Team USA have not provided any official comment on the system they used.

While it would seem that the actuator device is legal, if it is attached directly to its own power supply, the wider question remains as to whether a boat should be raced with a computer, rather than a human, driving a primary control function.

The Racing Rules on the matter are very clear RRS42 Propulsion states: A yacht shall compete only by using the wind and water to increase, maintain or decrease her speed. Her crew may adjust the trim of the wing, sails, rudders, daggerboards and hulls, and perform other acts of seamanship.

The vital words are at the opening of the second sentence 'her crew' - meaning that an automated adjustment which works independently of crew intervention is illegal.

Then BMW Oracle Racing did have very sophisticated on-board systems in 2010 in the Deed of Gift Match, which amongst other things they were able to overlay a line image of the optimum wingsail shape against the actual image, enabling the crew to make the adjustment required to get the two shapes into alignment, and achieve the ultimate performance.

That is one step away from having the wingsail shape adjusted by a computer independent of the crew which under RRS42 is illegal. Even under the current America's Cup rules such a system is quite legal, and it is hard not to believe that such systems were not used again in the 2013 America's Cup. The key point being that there must be a crew intervention between the computer and the sail or other control named in RRS42.

Of course computers are not infallible, and any intelligent computer system requires a lot of tweaking and refinement to be operate consistently and at a refined level. It all takes time - and time is the most vital commodity in the America's Cup.

The time for application to the International Jury over such a matter, is long gone. The rules require that a competitor protests or lodges an application to the Jury as soon as they are aware of a measurement issue, not later or at the end of a regatta.
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Re: Cupa Americii

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Ce zice ardeleanul in gara cand pierde trenul?
- Asa-i daca n-ai lucrul tau!

Pt cei care il injura pe Larry acum pot sa aiba lucrul lor. O echipa de CA scoasa la vanzare de lichidatorii judiciari cu tot echpamentul, inclusiv baza din Spania.

Imagine

Imagine

Imagine

Imagine

Pt cei cu marine sau care planuiesc sa aiba vreo marina: macara portal de vanzare la pret de lichidare. Lucru rar!

Imagine
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Re: Cupa Americii

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Mai multe despre dispozitivul de control al aripilor portante folosit de cei de la Oracle.

Imagine


Cela dit… oui, les Américains avaient bien une arme particulière. Et même plusieurs. Pas vraiment secrètes, en fait. Et tout à fait loyales, légales, autorisées. Dans le désordre, Philippe Presti comme coach (James Spithill n’en fait que des éloges), une foi inébranlable dans leur équipe (les navigants comme les techniciens à terre), des ingénieurs français haut de gamme, un tacticien (Ben Ainslie) et un régleur d’aile (Kyle Langford) remplaçants qui ont montré talent et maîtrise, une remise en question permanente (changement total dans leur façon de régler l’aile, puis de naviguer au près), une recherche continuelle de perfection (petits ailerons en bas des jupes), une aile admirable, une plate-forme sublime, des foils aboutis. Et un «Race Winner».

Car, oui, vous le lirez en exclusivité dans notre numéro de novembre, les Américains ont bien mis au point une mécanique précise, destinée à redonner à Oracle des vols fluides et stabilisés, une capacité de foiler même au près, une absolue sérénité dans les prises de décision ; oui, ils ont bel et bien imaginé et réalisé une machine infernale, chargée de dynamiter l’assurance des Kiwis.

Les Américains, ai-je dit ? En fait, c’est un ingénieur français qui est à l’origine de ce «faiseur de victoire», Dimitri Despierres. Certains d’entre vous connaissent déjà celui qui fut l’un des artisans de la victoire du trimaran géant BMW-Oracle en 2010. En exclusivité pour nous, pour vous, Dimitri raconte dans notre numéro 513 l’histoire et le fonctionnement de ce «Race Winner» pas secret du tout : les schémas – publics, accessibles à leurs adversaires !– en ont été déposés auprès du Jury International, et les Kiwis lui ont même demandé de se positionner sur la légalité de la chose. Ce qui fut fait – positivement, faut-il le dire…
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Re: Cupa Americii

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Un articol lung si bine scris despre CA.

Against the Wind - One of the Greatest Comebacks in Sports History


Six days later, early in the morning of Sept. 20, Jimmy Spithill drove through the empty streets of San Francisco to the Oracle base for what he thought could be the team's final race.

While Oracle had figured out how to match New Zealand's speed upwind, it hadn't yet mastered the technique. The Kiwis had rallied to win two of the next three races, giving them an 8-1 advantage—thanks to the two-race penalty meted out to Oracle at the beginning—then Oracle had taken a race. Still, one more loss for Oracle and it was done.

Instead of turning on the car radio, Mr. Spithill plugged in his iPod and played one of his favorite songs, Rage Against the Machine's "Take the Power Back."

It was another foggy afternoon and the winds were unusually light. At the start, New Zealand took an early lead. As Oracle fell behind, the team continued making mistakes. The Kiwis sailed away through the fog. Their lead grew to nearly a mile. It was, for all intents and purposes, the end.

The Kiwis had one thing going against them. Under Cup rules, the winning team had to complete the course within 40 minutes or the race would be abandoned. The winds were so light, and the pace so slow, Mr. Spithill didn't think the Kiwis could do it. But he wasn't sure.

At exactly 2 p.m., Mr. Spithill heard the voice of a race official in the radio. "This is the race committee," he said. "The time limit has expired."

The Kiwis, about three minutes from the finish, had run out of time. "It just wasn't meant to be," says Mr. Dalton, the Kiwi team's managing director.

The day wasn't over yet. About 30 minutes later, the winds had picked up and the two boats entered the starting area to try again.

The Kiwis beat Oracle at the starting line. But by the time Oracle got to the upwind leg, it had a 20-second lead. It won by a commanding 84 seconds. The score was now 8-3.

On the next day of racing, Oracle took an early lead and held on to win by 23 seconds. In the day's second race, it did the same, winning by 37 seconds.

It was now 8-5. Oracle now was foiling faster upwind than the Kiwis. But Mr. Spithill was well aware that with one misstep, it would be over. Still, the America's Cup would be a race after all.

In the next race, Oracle outmaneuvered New Zealand off the starting line and led wire-to-wire. The score was 8-6.

The crowds were growing. Spectators who had earlier cheered for the underdogs from New Zealand had begun to cheer for the Americans.

On Sept. 24, Oracle took an early lead in the first race that it never relinquished. In the day's second race, it took the lead on the upwind leg and won by 54 seconds. The score was 8-8.

Now it was the turn of Mr. Dalton, the New Zealand team's managing director, to fear the worst: that the Oracle team might pull off the greatest comeback in Cup history.

The next day, Sept. 25, was the day of the decisive 19th race. During his drive to the base, Mr. Spithill listened to Pearl Jam's live rendition of "Immortality."

As a powerboat towed the Oracle yacht past the Kiwi base, Oracle's sailors waved at their opponents in what had become a daily test: How many New Zealand team members would wave back? This time, nearly all of them did.

Mr. Dalton, New Zealand's managing director, now saw his team's prospects as bleak. "We knew we were going to lose the last race unless we sailed a perfect race," he said.

About 45 minutes before the start, Mr. Spithill heard a loud bang. A critical piece of the sail—a part attaching some of the flaps to the wing—had sheared off. The wing wouldn't curve properly without it.

Oracle goes into 'beast mode' to take the lead on the upwind leg of Race 19.


Two powerboats sped over and the maintenance guys climbed up onto the wing and started shooting hot glue everywhere. They finished the job about five minutes before the boat had to enter the starting area. Mr. Spithill and his tactician looked at each other and laughed.

On the San Francisco shore, the Oracle supporters were back in full force, waving American flags. Just after the boats crossed the starting line, Oracle caught a gust of wind that sent its bows submarining into the water, costing it precious seconds.

Mr. Spithill had decided to sail conservatively. He wouldn't get tangled with the Kiwis on the downwind leg, lest they crash or capsize. His goal was to keep it close until the upwind section, where he knew his boat now was faster.


When Oracle hit that leg, it trailed New Zealand by only three seconds. On every tack, it edged closer. Not far from the San Francisco waterfront, Oracle took a lead. When the upwind leg was done, Oracle was up by 26 seconds. The race was all but over.

As Oracle approached the finish line, Mr. Spithill glanced at one of his teammates, Kyle Langford, who was working in front of him. Mr. Langford, a 24-year-old last-minute addition to the crew, was in charge of adjusting the angle of the 13-story sail with a thick rope he held in his hands. There was nothing high-tech about this job, but it was absolutely crucial. If Mr. Langford dropped the rope, the yacht would quickly lose momentum and possibly capsize.

About three minutes from the finish line, the rope slipped out of Mr. Langford's hands. He lunged and caught a piece of it with his left hand—just barely—and held on. Mr. Spithill laughed and said, "Nice catch, mate."

Oracle crossed the finish line 44 seconds ahead of New Zealand. The sailors hugged.

A powerboat pulled up five minutes later. On it was Oracle founder Larry Ellison. He stepped aboard the yacht and said, "Do you guys know what you just did? You just won the America's Cup!"
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Re: Cupa Americii

Mesaj necitit de Florio »

skipper scrie:Ce zice ardeleanul in gara cand pierde trenul?
- Asa-i daca n-ai lucrul tau!

Pt cei care il injura pe Larry acum pot sa aiba lucrul lor. O echipa de CA scoasa la vanzare de lichidatorii judiciari cu tot echpamentul, inclusiv baza din Spania.

Pt cei cu marine sau care planuiesc sa aiba vreo marina: macara portal de vanzare la pret de lichidare. Lucru rar!

Imagine

Nu m-am priceput sa accesez ascunzisurile site-ului, as fi vrut sa vad detalii despre macara.
La noi nu cred sa fie vreo marina interesata sa se doteze astfel, fiindca e pentru clienti si clientii sa se descurce .
Lucrurile pot sta altfel cu Marina Eforie, care avand in spate pe Bogdan, un om pasionat, a aratat ca se pot face multe.
Ma gandeam sa ii dau informatia asta. Nu strica deloc.

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Re: Cupa Americii

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O veste buna: bibelurile din J-Class vor intra si ele in CA. Nu ca acum 80 de ani dar, asa, o regata, de pofta!

Showcasing the tradition of the event, the majestic titans of the 1930s will return to the America’s Cup after 80 years

J Class Regatta scheduled for June 2017

Cowes, UK, 12 February, 2015: The J Class Association (JCA) is thrilled to announce that the J Class has accepted an invitation from the Organisers of the 2017 America’s Cup to participate in a J Class regatta during the AC35 event. All eight J Class yachts are expected in Bermuda, with a minimum of six anticipated to compete in the J Class regatta – the first time in history more than five J Class yachts have ever raced against each other.

“The J Class era of the America’s Cup is widely recognised as being among the high points in Cup history,” said Russell Coutts, director of the America’s Cup Event Authority (ACEA).

“When racing for the America’s Cup in the 1930s, the J Class boats embodied grace and power with cutting-edge design and engineering. Having the J Class join us in Bermuda will create a spectacular blend between the old and new.”

Berthed at the centre of the Race Village, the J Class fleet will showcase the heritage and tradition of the America’s Cup. The yachts will also be at the heart of the action with their own exclusive four day regatta.

Louise Morton, Secretary of the J Class Association (JCA) commented: “The America’s Cup Organisers have offered the J Class a unique opportunity to be part of the America’s Cup for the first time in 80 years. On behalf of the Owners, Captains and crew, we are delighted to accept their kind invitation and look forward to being part of this spectacular event.”

Racing in the J Class regatta will be organized by the America’s Cup race management team with the final two days of racing expected to straddle the opening weekend of the America’s Cup Match.

The current J Class fleet comprises seven yachts, including two of the original Js that raced for the America’s Cup. The seven J Class yachts sailing are: Endeavour, Hanuman, Lionheart, Rainbow, Ranger, Shamrock V and Velsheda. J8 is due to be launched in May 2015, taking fleet strength to eight – the first time that eight Js have been sailing since 1934.

J Class fleet racing is one of the most spectacular sights on the world sailing circuit. The Class continues to expand and the fleet is warmly welcomed by regatta organisers around the world. Followers logging on to http://www.jclassyachts.com" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; can also enjoy every tack and gybe as it happens thanks to live race tracking fitted to every yacht.
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Re: Cupa Americii

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No, ashe!

Significant cost saving measures planned for 2017 America’s Cup



The competitors and organizers of the 2017 America’s Cup are planning to implement a series of rule changes to dramatically reduce team operational costs, primarily by racing in a smaller boat.

“After reviewing prototypes of the new AC45 sports boats being tested on the water over the past several months, it is clear that if we raced smaller boats in 2017, we could dramatically reduce costs without sacrificing any of the spectacle or the design, engineering and athletic challenge fundamental to the America’s Cup,” said Commercial Commissioner Harvey Schiller.

“We have a responsibility to think of what is best for the long term health of the America’s Cup as well as improving the value equation for team principals and partners. Racing a smaller boat in 2017 and beyond is a big step in the right direction.

“The existing operational costs of teams is much too high with a boat like the AC62. We discussed making this change early last year at a Competitors meeting in London but at that stage only ORACLE TEAM USA and Emirates Team New Zealand were in favor of using a smaller boat.

“But now that the teams have seen these new boats in action there is a clear majority of competitors who support the idea. I’d like to be able to say we have unanimous support from all the teams but that is not the case.”

Boat speed in the new boat is expected to be similar to what was achieved in the last America’s Cup through increased time foiling and advances in design and engineering.

“This will be a big change, but it is a necessary one if we are to create a sustainable America's Cup for the future,” said Sir Ben Ainslie, the skipper and team principal of Ben Ainslie Racing. “These boats will create a significant cost saving whilst still providing a real challenge for sailors and designers alike.”

“For Team France this will be a game-changer,” said skipper Franck Cammas. “We will be able to have a very competitive team for about half the budget. With the smaller boat we can imagine that a budget between €15-20 million would be enough to win the America’s Cup.”

To lock in the cost saving measures over the long-term several competitors, including Artemis Racing, have committed to using the new smaller class in the next edition of the America’s Cup should they prevail in this one.

“These changes may help some current teams be more competitive, but this is clearly also about building the future of the America’s Cup,” said Iain Percy, the team manager of Artemis Racing.

“By making a commitment now to using the smaller boat next time, it will be that much easier for new teams to join as they’ll have access to existing boats and technology. So this has required us to look a little bit beyond the scope of ‘what’s in it for us?’.”

The rule changes are being drafted and teams will be asked to vote on these changes before the end of March.
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